Dear Editor: One of the most obnoxious talking points from marijuana legalization opponents is claiming more research is needed before it can even be considered.

Additional studies would help fill the gaps in knowledge, but cannabis is not new. Cannabis was a widely used patent medicine in the United States during the 19th and early 20th centuries, first described in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1850.

In the late 1960s-early 1970s, the U.S. government funded medical studies of cannabis.A study at UCLA found that cannabis was a treatment for glaucoma. In October 1972, as a young man struggling with pain and loss of sight from congenital glaucoma, I smoked some cannabis before a checkup and my doctor found my pressures normal. I have continued to use cannabis my entire adult life and it has been very helpful not just for glaucoma, but also chronic pain, arthritis, heart disease and other conditions as I’ve aged.

Another study at UCLA found that not only is smoking cannabis not linked to cancer, it appears to protect against pulmonary cancers.

Dr. Greg Carter of the University of Washington observed at the Patients Out of Time conference in Portland, Oregon, in 2014, “We know more about how cannabis works than we do probably 85-90 percent of prescription medications. It’s a fallacy that we don’t have enough information about cannabis. We have 10,000 years of historical data on cannabis.”

Cannabis was completely legal through all of human history up until 1937. Cannabis prohibition has ruined millions of lives. Gov. Tony Evers gets it. Too bad the majority party would rather play politics with people’s lives than actually do something that benefits all Wisconsinites.

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Gary Storck

Editor, Cannabadger.com

Madison

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